Helen’s Golden Tears

Dear pagan readers,

 

Today, let’s talk about a very powerful aromatic plant which everyone knows and which many of you probably eat to on a daily basis. It is still widely used and considered in our kitchen and herbal medicine of nowadays, but not even as half as it was back in antiquity. This plant was considered sacred among ancient europeans and his name was synonymous with courage and bravery in ancient Greece. Ancient Greeks believed this plant and its extracts could restore vigor and mental acuity. They burned it as a religious incense to give them courage in battle. It was also burned as an incense at funerals and placed in the burial mound of the dead. Even Gaius Plinius Secundus, (circa 23 – 79 A.C.E.), better known as Pliny the Elder, said that when it is burned, it “puts to flight all venomous creatures”.

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Moreover, at the time of knights, ladies embroidered a bee buzzing around a sprig of thyme on the scarf of the knights. It was meant to make them remember that they should always bring fairness and kindness in their activities and that it would give them courage and strength, a kind of silent memory from the distant past. Thyme was used throughout the ancient world: the Egyptians applied it in the mummification process, the Greeks burnt it as incense in sacred temples, and Romans treated the depression with it. The ancient egyptians used thyme in the making of their embalmment preparation because of his antiseptic virtue and aroma. It was also used to perfume and purify the sacred greek temples and public bath for the same reason. And the romans were pretending to cure depression by eating and burning it. As said earlier, thyme is linked with bees and honey. Bees appreciate thyme flowers a lot and mediterranean thyme honey is among the most tasty and reputated honey around the world. During the middle ages a sprig of thyme was placed under the pillow to induce sleep and to prevent nightmares. According to another folk belief, fairies supposedly love thyme. Throughout Europe people used to plant large beds of thyme to attract fairies. In A Midsummer Nights Dream, Shakespeare referenced that folk association when writing that Titania, the Queen of the fairies, often went to “a bank whereon the wild thyme blows”. My grand mother told me once ”Oh! Such beautiful memories I keep of the hikes through the hills of Spain and Italy when we found blooming bushes of thyme. What flavor, what strength and power which emerged from small leaves that look more like needles. Indeed, when it grows in its place of origin, thyme is picked pretty dry but with a concentration that we do not get here in our wetter and colder climate”. ”It is the enemy of the toxines because it is a powerful antiseptic” thus said Armand Trousseau(1801-1867) the famous french doctor who performed the first tracheotomy in Paris. This claim as been clinically proven nowadays. As you can see, thyme is a thousand purposes plant, symbol of purity and courage throughout the ages.

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After all, it’s pretty normal that this plant is highly considered for so long when we learn that it is born from the silent tear drop of the most beautiful of all women on earth. Thymus vulgaris, as told in the Iliad, is born from the tear drop of Ἑλένη της Σπάρτα, better known as Helen of Troy, one of the three iconic sorceresses in the pagan initiation ritual. In fact, thyme, is one of the secret lore given to the initiate by the sorceress. A gift, to strengthen the May King’s Hamingja. For a person ‘said to smell of thyme’ meant someone of admirable style, activity, and energy. As you may have understand, the Iliad is in fact a description of the pagan initiation ritual. But that is another subject that I will eleborate in future articles…

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Once again I ask you all: will you refuse such a beautiful gift given to us by a living goddess? So celebrate the health, purity and courage by making good use of the thyme!

 

Hail the pagan secret lores! Hail Europa!

 

Fredrik Blanchet

 

 

 

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