Belus is coming back! Part II: The saviour that you trample upon

Dear pagan readers,

Now let’s talk about a plant that saved me and my relatives many times from infections and illnesses. It is even a part of our nutrition(very rich in calcium, vitamin A, C & K). You have surely trampled upon that magic plant many times in your life yet without knowing. Don’t be afraid, you haven’t cause any important damage to this plant by doing so, it always rises stronger again. Perhaps you even helped the plant by transporting the pollen and seeds under your feet so be consoled my friends!

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For me, it is one of the most sacred of all plants. It is commonly called the Plantago(Plantain in french), but I prefer to call it ”Belus’ footprint” or simply ”Belus’ feet”. Like I said, I use it in my nutrition but also as an internal/external medicine. It is one of the plants that will ensure the hunter gatherer lifestyle. People think they need to grow vegetables and grains to get enough minerals and vitamins in their nutrition. That is the kind of plant who prove them wrong. There’s a plenty of information about the Plantago and his medicinal virtues on the web.So here’s a few links that will give you information about the 3 main varieties in the Plantago family.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago_major

Grote_weegbree_Plantago_major_subsp._major

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago_lanceolata

Plantago_lanceolata_flowers

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plantago_media

Plantago-media

So I won’t lose my time writing what as already been written. Instead I will write about what is unsaid about ”The feet of Belus”. One thing that as puzzled me for long about this magic plant is the fact that it even start growing under thick layers of snow in early spring. I even start gathering some leaves in early March. For long I have asked myself: how can a plant grow without light? For long I have figured that it must be some kind of invisible vibrations that is feeding this plant. I think a part of the answer can be found here. Thanks to Marie Cachet for such bright description of this phenomenon. It is the electromagnetic radiations from the celestial bodies that are feeding the plantago even under a thick layer of snow of course!  A divine plant fed by the divine light! Nothing less! It is the feet of Belus! Use it to heal your wounds, even for ophthalmic purpose. Eat it fresh in salad during spring, and cook it in stew during summer and autumn. It is a gift to us offered by Belus! Will you refuse such a marvelous gift from a god? Open your arms to the gifts of the gods!

Frederik Blanchett

P.S

Tell your relatives but not a word to those who are not worth it. Let them pray their false god ’til death instead! He will give them what they deserve…

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35 thoughts on “Belus is coming back! Part II: The saviour that you trample upon

    • For an unexperimented eye, I think a lot of plants looks the same. You just have to keep in mind the main caracteristics of the Plantago: on the leaves, the veins(5 to 9) always starts from the roots and run on the leaves in parallel to finally join at the peak of leaves. Those are sheathing, smooth or slightly hairy. That’s universal to all Plantago varieties, whatever if it’s sprouted, bloomed, or well growth. If you are not sure, you can also refer to the roots. It as short rhizome and the rootlets exceed 20 cm. I suggest you to take a look at the several pictures available on the web to familiarize yourself with the Plantago.

  1. It’s true this plant is very beneficial. I used to peel the outer crust of the leaves and put it on wounds and cuts as a kid, it really increases the healing rate. Didn’t know it’s good for eating though, will have to try that soon.

    • I suggest you to prepare a salad with young plantago leaves and dandelion leaves. You can put fresh veggies, seeds(ex: sunflower) or nuts of your choice with a dressing.

      You said you used to put it on wounds and cuts as a kid, why? Just intuition? Or someone told you to do that?

    • (shame on enter button)
      …magical. You only eat the leaves if I’m right?
      I always liked this kind of knowledge, thank you for sharing and I hope you post more and more about plants!

      • The roots, seeds and flowers can also be eaten, but there’s different processes and specific purposes. I suggest you to start with the leaves as there’s no preparation needed and no side effect.

  2. Is it found in Louisiana, Frederik? I harvested something and I froze it and put it off until spring, of course. It has little hairs on the leaves, is this what I should be looking for?
    Thanks.

    • For an unexperimented eye, I think a lot of plants looks the same. You just have to keep in mind the main caracteristics of the Plantago: on the leaves, the veins(5 to 9) always starts from the roots and run on the leaves in parallel to finally join at the peak of leaves. Those are sheathing, smooth or slightly hairy. That’s universal to all Plantago varieties, whatever if it’s sprouted, bloomed, or well growth. If you are not sure, you can also refer to the roots. It as short rhizome and the rootlets exceed 20 cm. I suggest you to take a look at the several pictures available on the web to familiarize yourself with the Plantago. You can also send me a picture of the plants you harvested, I’ll tell you if it’s Plantago or not.

      • Hello, Frederik.
        I will just say that I am now going back to the forested bog I found this plant at and I will find another to show you in picture. They are not so common are they?
        Thank you, sir, for the reply.

      • Alrighty, man. Right now you’re playing the role of the village druid because I have no clue what this is. But I do have a faith that it’s what I’m looking for.
        I found this along the side of a swamp, and I hope you can identify it as plantago.
        Here you go: http://imgur.com/a/4CasH

      • Thanks for the compliment my friend. That’s surely the kind of role I would assume in a pagan village…

        Unfortunately it isn’t my friend. Look at the veins, they are linked to a central vein. The Plantago isn’t like that. All the veins starts from the roots and run along the leaf like a demicircle ’till the point of the leaf. The veins are never connect to each other. Always separate. Look at this drawing, you will understand what I mean: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d7/Illustration_Plantago_major0_clean.jpg

        If you have any other questions, let me know.

    • Oh wow. Okay, so what I keep finding is not plantago, this must be related to the sedimentary soil I’m finding here in Louisiana.
      Thank you much for this help, comrade, and I will go read your new post on nettles. If you could get back to me on the exact nutrition value of the plant, that would be much appreciated by myself and my family who I am introducing this to.

      • Oh never mind. I see where you mention calcium, vitamins A, C, K, and I see some comments telling us of its healing value.
        My mother would always use aloe vera when I lived in the prairies of Colorado. I will introduce this to her because she has always had some knowledge in botany and the lore of herbs in general.
        Thank you again, and I wish you much more Springtime to come.

  3. Howdy are using WordPress for your site platform? I’m new to the blog world but I’m trying to get started and set up my own. Do you need any coding knowledge to make your own blog? Any help would be greatly appreciated!

    • I don’t really have the time to explain it all, in fact I don’t even have the time to finish all the articles I planned to publish on Vinland Heritage. But here’s a short ”resumé”. You simply subscribe to wordpress and start a blog. You choose your theme and put the colors and pictures you want. It’s pretty easy, no coding…

  4. Pingback: Baldr shining – The Development of the Garden | Longing for Thule

  5. A friend of the family lately helped me in the garden and told me some things about the weeds growing. She said that there is plantago which is used for medical purposes, but she showed me a common plantago plant and said that it was poisonous and that one gets ache in the stomach of it. My husband and I had already eaten the leaves of the same type earlier, and it tasted good and we didn’t have any problems, so I don’t quite understand why she thinks that this plant is bad? I couldn’t find anything about any plantago plant being bad either. Do you know why she would think so?

    • The only possible reason is, with all due respect, that she’s twisted. Plantago is among the more beneficial plants in the world, one of the only one that can be used for internal, external and also ophthalmic purpose. The pH of this plant is better than 90% of the spring water around the world. This plant is everything but irritant. I really don’t know why she said that…

      • I guess it must be so. She is a Christian, so I can imagine who twisted her…
        Regarding the link, copy it in your browser together with the part “.jpg”

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